Sep 21, 2011

Changing Lives.. Making a Difference

As a leader of yet another community service project, I visited an NGO that does some amazing service among the less privileged among us.

The Freedom Foundation, founded in the early '90s was born out of a need that two philanthropists, a Doctor and a De-addiction Therapist, knew existed.
Starting in a location that was way out of town at that time, the center initially treated (alcohol/drug) addicts who needed help. However, Dr Ashok Rau and Late Karl Sequeira soon realized the need for a center that would care for children who are HIV -infected.
Thus began, the current facility at Geddalahalli, roughly four kilometers from the Hennur main road.

What started with three students have now grown to over 25 children who live full-time at nine of its nicely furnished rooms.
Of course there are a lot of NGOs that do outstanding work in the field of HIV research and care, but what struck me about The Freedom Foundation was how bureaucracy and civic apathy can stunt even the most altruistic NGO.
Meeting with the director at the NGO, I could understand the pain - of not having donors, of not having sufficient funding, at fighting a loosing battle - and the determination. Take for instance, the case of two orphaned siblings. The three year old girl was HIV positive was forcefully separated from her seven year old brother, who was HIV negative. The government naturally believed the boy stood a better chance of a good life, gave him up for adoption. The Freedom Foundation, on the other hand believed that the siblings must not be separated, being as it is that the girl didn't have her parents and her brother was her only family remaining. After months of legal wrangling and much debate, the honorable courts did find sense in letting the brother be with his younger sister.

If being HIV positive was not a death sentence in itself, red tapism makes it even more exasperating.
Barred from receiving any foreign aid by archaic rules, I could feel the plight of survival.
To a government that believes being HIV positive is a punishment for your lifestyle choices, every victim is just another statistic.

I went around the in-patient facility, surveying and understanding the needs of the Foundation. Partly because I would be leading a team of 14 from my Company who will help 'Beautify the Centre' and make the day a little more joyful for the children and partly because I was moved by the plight of the Foundation that is visibly struggling.

As kids, they didn't choose to be branded, but as adults we can make sure they have a fair shot at education, a promising career and a family of their own. 
While many talk about equal opportunities, our schools, colleges and workplaces are not willing to walk the talk.
I was told how the warden and the Director had to pull strings to convince the institutions to admit the HIV -infected and -affected children to schools and colleges.
Isn't this another face of that prejudiced monster we call - Corruption?

While we are eager to spend thousands on wasteful birthday bashes, anniversary gifts and exotic vacations, what we forget to remember is how just $75 would take care of the costs of the ART for one child in a month. And it costs just $150 for an entire year's education for that child. Surely, we can afford this. Can't we?

If seeing is believing, the Freedom Foundation is indeed an eye-opener. I'd recommend you to visit them, even if you don't have any intention of serving their cause. I came away thinking of the many ways that we take our charmed lives for granted.

If you think you would like to contribute to a noble cause, please visit them here where you can contribute just about anything. 
Your change could make the difference we need.
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