Oct 12, 2015

A brutal way to die | Manna for your Soul

This post is long due and delayed because of the amount of research that went into this. 

A couple of weeks ago, I polled people about 'the most brutal and violent ways to die' online. 
I got a deluge of responses and many were simply shocked that I would ask such a question online. Some were curious and others were quite scandalized that I would even think of something like this. 
Many thought I had way too much time in hand, but I still did get a lot of interesting answers. 

Many believed a person would die a violent death if he/she is slowly and painfully tortured until life gives up. I didn't think it would be violent to be slowly and meticulously tortured, because while the physical injuries can be shocking, the body's capabilities to withstand and tolerate pain gradually increases to a point where the victim is either completely numb from the effects or has lost sensation in that part of the body and no longer is dying a brutal and violent death. 
Others thought, being shot or decapitated was a gruesome way to die. I doubt this qualifies since the speed of a bullet piercing or an object slicing through the body is so fast that many times, the victim won't even feel pain and may get dizzy and die only because of excessive blood loss. 
Some even thought burning/lynching is a good way to die hard. I don't think burning is painful enough, because our body releases endorphins and morphine to combat the pain the moment the top layer of the skin is signed. In most cases, as in instances where people die trapped in buildings on fire, the victims faint because of smoke inhalation and are not conscious when their bodies are completely charred. 
Personally, after witnessing how my dad valiantly fought cancer, thought accidental irradiation and lifestyle diseases like cancer and the prolonged treatment of radiation was the worst way to die. But my dad only got exhausted after weeks of painful cycles of radiation and at the end, he was happy to leave. Radiation isn't the worst killer here either.
But then a Jewish reader gave me a very interesting answer. One that answered several questions I had in my mind. One that brought back images so gruesome that people rarely talk about it anymore. 
Crucifixion. It was a brutal combination of some of the most painful ways to die.

The name brings up images of Jesus and his last moments on the cross. 

First used among the Seleucids, Carthaginians, and Romans from about the 6th century BC to the 4th century AD, Crucifixion was invented by the Romans in 300 - 400 BC as punishment for the most serious of criminals. The upright wooden cross was the most common technique, and the time victims took to die would depend on how they were crucified.
Jesus was the last known person to be sentenced to die on the upright cross, and in the year 337 AD, Roman emperor Constantine abolished Crucifixion. 

But how did the Crucifixion kill? Historians and theologians have agreed that Crucifixion is and shall remain the most gruesome, brutal and painful way to die. A quick search online for how crucifixion kills will tell you that suffocation because of the inability to breathe when
the victim's arms are stretched and nailed to either sides, massive loss of blood because nails are driven into major veins/arteries, over-exposure ultimately leading to multiple organ failure. In most cases, death would come before endorphins kicked in and many times, soldiers would break off the legs of the victims so that they died faster. 
Remember this was after the victim was sentenced to a pre-determined number of whips/lashes, which always had barbed wire or nails at the ends. With flesh exposed and the skin peeled away, the body will be going through a cycle of pain, shock and numbness until he/she is finally (and fatally) nailed to the cross. Let's also remember the victim didn't have a valet service for their cross. They often had to trek with their own crosses to the top of a hill. The victim would be laid down on the cross, their arms stretched out and nails driven into their wrists (severing the arteries and fracturing the wrist bones), their feet stacked upon a pedestal and nailed and then hoisted to an upright position on the perch of the hill for the rest of the country to see. The victim is then left conscious until they suffer from multiple organ failure, because they cannot exhale or inhale with arms pulled out of the sockets and unable to lift their bodies because their legs are broken, the victim is brutally aware of the way his/her body 'shuts down' and gives up. (Source: How did crucifixion kill)
Sometimes, victims were given psychotropic drugs/alcohol to prolong and multiply the brutality the body will inflict on the mind. 

See, now this makes sense to me. As a Christian, I now have a renewed sense of awe (if you may call it) and reverence to the amount of suffering that Jesus put Himself through. Christians are told that Jesus died for our sins. Yes, He did. It truly was the most brutal way to go. It was the only way to atone for generations of sin. Like a ginormous sponge to soak up a trillion liters of water, God realized that crucifixion was the only way possible to 'buy out' all our sins. 

If you've seen 'Passion of the Christ' or any other equally realistic portrayal of the Passion, you'd have wondered why He was put through the brutal lashes, the need to justify Himself, the moments where He was mocked, the fury from the crowds, stand the scathing insults from high priests and finally the sense of loneliness that He went through. Like some atheists would have questioned, this is something I have wondered - why the Crucifixion. Because that was how it was at that time. Today, as we hear of justice being denied or delayed merely because the law chose to thread a path the media and public chose, I am pained. 
As millions solemnly commemorate the way a nation put one innocent Man to a death He didn't deserve,  do you feel a eerie sense of deja vu?
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