Showing posts with label Physically Challenged. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Physically Challenged. Show all posts

Saturday, September 01, 2012

No nation for handicaps [245/365]

We, Indians, will never learn a lesson even if it hits us in the face and spits in our finger bowls.
Case in point- Public apathy at the Special Olympics, London.

Wait! I thought the Olympics was over! Sure, and so is corruption.
While most of the civilized world treats its citizens, able bodied and otherwise, with fearful respect and enough opportunities, closer home our 'handicapped' are lucky if they get a PCO and a job in the diversity quota.

I read an article in the British tabloids of how officials of the Paralympic Commitee of India (PCI) have gifted themselves and their families an 'all expenses paid trip' across our motherland (London, for the uninitiated) while our special bodied sportspeople are left to rot or die trying at the stadiums. Well, if it is any consolation, they must be used to the public apathy that they get back home too.

While the six medalists from our Summer Olympics are still getting used to the fame and fattened cheques, it would take our paralympic contingent nothing short of a miracle to get a medal. While I won't blame the athletes for the dry run, this only proves how deep the rot is.

Clearly, this is no nation for the Special People in our lives.


Sunday, April 15, 2012

The lesser known Heroes [105/365]

source: Bangalore Mirror
While humanity will continue to debate if size does matter, I've always believed that disability doesn't matter.
I've been fortunate to interact and work with several people who were physically or mentally challenged. Besides the fact that we tend to forget how we take a lot of things for granted, physically challenged individuals are exceptionally abled.

They may not have the same faculties that we have, but they do have the same aspirations as we do. And most times, their challenges and the lessons that life in a cruel world has taught them, they are stronger willed than most able-bodied people I know. Perhaps we write them off too soon. Perhaps we kiddie spoon them too often.
While serving with NGOs like Freedom Foundation and Spastics Society, I've realized that we need to treat them with dignity and respect. They really don't need a freebie. They won't ask you for a concession or a quota.

When I see people with a disability begging on the streets and at traffic stops, it baffles me. I wonder why we allow them to live the easy life. With the kind of potential that a differently abled individual could bring to our world, I wonder why we would encourage any disabled individual to beg ever.

Case in point, 23 year old visually challenged student Poonam Vaidya. Reading her story in 'The Sunday Read' within The Bangalore Mirror gave me a tinkling feeling. I felt good reading it. (Read the inspiring story here)
One of the best lines, and one that I've always believed in, is when she says - '...A disability is only a disability if you think it disables you. A disability only prevents you from doing something in the way other people do it. It doesn't disable you, at least that's what I think.'
Living as a visually challenged person can be cruel in a world of colors. But Poonam set her goals, knew her limitations, explored her possibilities, stretched her abilities, and conquered her summit.
It is people like this that proves that there is hope in this world.

A big standing ovation to the lesser known heroes of this world: Bravo, Poonam!

Recommended Read:
Poonam's blog


Friday, September 23, 2011

Able and Willing.. Part 1

Community Service to many of us is a farce. An event where we get a paid day off.
While many who volunteer their time think they are doing a favor to those who are underprivileged, I think it's the other way round. They are doing us a favor by letting us be a part of their special life.


The ThomsonReuters Foundation, tied up with 25 NGOs, each a pioneer in their field. Unprecedented in scale and involvement, we'll have 2500 employees taking part in 250 projects across 4 months.

In a series of posts, I'll attempt to pen down my experiences with the 19 projects that I will be a part of this year.

Sept 17th, 2011.
'Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day....teach a man to fish and he will eat for a lifetime'
Unnati works on empowering those sections of the society that is underprivileged and undermined in more ways than one.
With 12 enthusiastic volunteers, we were overwhelmed at the sight of over 200 candidates at the Centre on a bright and balmy Saturday morning.
A quick briefing and a short slideshow of the program cleared any doubts that my team had.

But what really impressed many of us was how streamlined the entire process was.
Interview on such a massive scale is always a logistical nightmare. However in Unnati, fully completed applications are screened for authenticity and tagged for any one of the 12 vocations taught at the NGO.

The kind of candidates that we saw impressed us too. Guys and girls who you'd otherwise not bat an eyelid if you passed them on the street were there, wanting to learn, work and be able to stand on their own feet. Nearly all of them reached Unnati because they had friends/relatives who were taught at the NGO.
Most of them were humble and open to instruction, criticism and feedback. Some were hell bent on working in a particular vocation, even though they lacked the skills. We had to persuade them and explain to them why they would not suit a vocation.
But all of them had an amazing attitude about life, smiling even though in abject poverty.
For the 150 odd candidates that did crack the interview, Sept 19th is just the beginning.
The team at Unnati that made a difference!

Towards the end of the day, we all had a wonderful time. Many of us saw ourselves in the candidates we interviewed.
And on our way back, we promised ourselves that we would want to be there when the 70 day course at Unnati finishes on the 3rd of December.

Karunashraya - Hospice
Sept 18th, 2011.
'All labor that uplifts humanity has dignity and importance and should be undertaken with painstaking excellence.'
The hospice for patients with cancer in it's advanced stages struck a very personal chord with me.
Having seen what cancer can do with a person and his/her family, the work that Karunashraya made me pause and ponder. Pain is an incredible thing. Something that you need to experience to know how much it pains, cancer is a painful death sentence.
Having seen my dad and his sisters loose their battles of cancer was painful. Scary even.
At Karunashreya, I saw death. Apparently the mortality rate at the hospice is as high as two deaths a day.

The history of the NGO is inspiring. Having gone through a corrupt bureaucracy, the NGO does manage to strike a delicate balance between altruism and sound policies.
We got to learn how the hospice functioned. What I noticed was how almost everything in the hospice was designed and done in such a way that death looses it's sting. 
Each of the 'guest' is allowed to wear their own clothes provided it is comfortable and easy to wear/remove, every guest is allowed to walk freely around the facility, every guest is given their choice of meal three times a day. And when the time comes that the guest has to 'depart', he/she is given a dignified way through doors that open directly into the veranda and wheeled to the 'Prayer room' where the relatives can accept the mortal remains.
All this is done so to make sure that none of the inmates see the bodies going out, even though all of them are quite sure that their turn to leave is not too far away.

Our project was to provide succor to the staff and nurses and relief even if it was just a day, from the gory reality of death around them.
Ranging from ages 18 to 25, you'd hardly notice anything different about the staff here and any other hospital. Dig deeper and you'll find that they all have a passion for selflessness. Polite yet steely resolved, working with terminally ill people require nerves of steel.
Would I want to work with Karunashraya again? Definitely Yes.

Sept 21st, 2011.
"For me, inclusion is about a community where everyone is recognized for their differences and everyone is recognized as belonging – not only in our schools, but in our communities."
As part of my third project, we had to plan and execute a gathering of 25 different NGOs that work for differently abled individuals. 
The first picture that comes to our minds when we talk about social service are images of individuals who are anemic, unintelligible and unscrupulous.
Having met 25 different NGOs involved in healthcare, employment and among specially abled individuals, my perception has improved. 
With over 2000 registered NGOs in the city of Bangalore alone, it is anybody's guess on why we need to pool in our collective resources. The need is certainly there. Being 'challenged' (or the more politically incorrect term 'disabled') does no longer mean that you should be begging for your living. With the wealth of resources that many of these NGOs have, getting a good job/living a respectable life is only a matter of connecting to the right organization.


With the NGOs promising to network and connect in a better way in the future, I believe we were able to hit all the right notes with our project.

Next Stop:
The Freedom Foundation


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